There is a point at which borders cease to be geographical lines and filters between states (always an over-simplified idea) and emerge instead as increasingly interoperable assemblages of control technologies strung out across the world’s infrastructures, circulations, cities, and bodies.

“There is a point at which borders cease to be geographical lines and filters between states (always an over-simplified idea) and emerge instead as increasingly interoperable assemblages of control technologies strung out across the world’s infrastructures, circulations, cities, and bodies.”

– Stephen Graham, Cities Under Siege

Day 1: The Borders We Cross

Great start to the workshop, with discussions about concepts and perceptions surrounding borders. We found a lot of interesting contrasts rooted in language and in culture, leading us to conclude that visible and invisible borders are highly socially constructed which need to be tactically addressed in context specific ways.

Personal Boundaries

Imponderabilia (1977) was a collaborative performance by  artist Marina Abramovic and Ulay, in which they flanked the entrance to the Galleria Communale d’Arte Moderna in Bologna, Italy—completely nude.

The City and the City

I recently heard about this book which brings to light the fact that different people and communities will use and experience the city in different ways. How do we consolidate and map these experience? What will it reveal?

Invisible Lines of Control

Maps are power projections. Adminsitrative jurisdiction and lines divide responsibilities for a space. But these lines made on paper force social processes into play with consequences in real space. Planning maps, as such, can be thought of as tools of violence, destruction and exclusion for their impact.

We must listen to voices that disagree with us, and have an open debate about how we use our powers and remember that government exists to serve the power of the individual not the other way around … that is what keeps us different to those on the other side of the wall.

We must listen to voices that disagree with us, and have an open debate about how we use our powers and remember that government exists to serve the power of the individual not the other way around … that is what keeps us different to those on the other side of the wall.

– Barack Obama, June 19th at the Brandenburg Gates
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What is a border?

the border: “a place for sharing, a ‘transactional space’. a zone of interaction, an ‘interval of resonance’, a location where functional relationships are evident, and potentially an area of community integration.”